The Power of Konnakol (3): Practising two-note groups

In part 3 of my series, we’re going to practise two-note groups on several subdivision levels. This video lesson is also about controlling polyrhythmic structures (e.g. 3 over 2, or 5 over 2). It includes an exercise in two versions, which sound a bit as if you’re time-stretching a scale … Enjoy!   topics: rhythm, konnakol, subdivisions, polyrhythms Level: advanced Instruments: for all instruments Duration: approx. 8 min Extras/Download: Additional exercise – for electric bass only   For a list of all my video lessons go here. You could also use the tag cloud (in the footer area of this…

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The Power of Konnakol (2): Creating a rhythmic grid

This is part 2 of my series on konnakol, a rhythm language that may help you improve your sense of rhythm. Here, I’m using konnakol in order to get control over the beat subdivisions. This video also shows how to play a 15/8 meter. It includes exercises #3 and 4. (Note: You should watch part 1 and my video on “Rhythm Basics” first.)   topics: rhythm, konnakol, subdivisions Level: basic Instruments: for all instruments Duration: 10 min   For a list of all my video lessons go here. You could also use the tag cloud (in the footer area of…

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The Power of Konnakol (1): Introduction

This is part 1 of my series on konnakol, a rhythm language that may help you improve your sense of rhythm. In this first video, I’m introducing the vocabulary of konnakol. It includes 2 exercises as well.   topics: rhythm, konnakol Level: basic Instruments: for all instruments Duration: 9 min   For a list of all my video lessons go here. You could also use the tag cloud (in the footer area of this website) in order to look for video lessons. All German-speaking viewers may have a look at my translation page.

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Rhythm Basics – Dividing the Beat

This lesson shows how to master different subdivisions of the beat, i.e. how to play 1 to 6 notes per beat. Usually called “rhythm pyramid”, this lesson is called “The Rhythm Elevator” here. It includes two exercises: an easier one, and a more advanced one with quintuplets and sextuplets.   topics: rhythm, subdivisions Level: basic Instruments: for all instruments Duration: 7 min   For a list of all my video lessons go here. You could also use the tag cloud (in the footer area of this website) in order to look for video lessons. All German-speaking viewers may have a…

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Fretboard Basics. Part 3: octaves and unisons

In this video lesson, I’m introducing 4 ways of playing octaves, and I’m showing how to play unisons. Unlike my first two “fretboard basics” videos, this video lesson was especially made for bass. (It can be modified for other string instruments, though.) This lesson contains exercises #7 and #8.   topics: fretboard, octaves, unisons Level: basic Instruments: bass Duration: 9 min   For a list of all my video lessons go here. You could also use the tag cloud (in the footer area of this website) in order to look for video lessons. All German-speaking viewers may have a look…

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Fretboard Basics. Part 2: flats and sharps

In this video lesson, I’m introducing the flat and the sharp sign, showing how to combine them with any note. Just like my first “fretboard basics” video, this video lesson can be applied to all string instruments, fretted or non-fretted. This lesson contains exercises #4 to 6.   topics: fretboard, note names Level: basic Instruments: all Western string instruments Duration: 9 min Extras/Download: Solution for exercise #6   For a list of all my video lessons go here. You could also use the tag cloud (in the footer area of this website) in order to look for video lessons. All…

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Fretboard Basics. Part 1: The musical alphabet

This video lesson introduces what I call the “musical alphabet”, i.e. the note names. Next, I’m going to show how to locate the notes on your fretboard (fingerboard). This video lesson can be applied to all string instruments in Western music (bass, guitar, mandolin etc.). Even on non-fretted instruments (e.g. violin, double bass, cello), you might want to try this approach, since it is basically the same. You can try to imagine (or visualize) frets in order to locate the notes on the fingerboard. Notes that are 2 “frets” apart, then, are further apart than notes on neighbouring frets. Consequently,…

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